wannabeanimator:

via Kotaku

Yogventures, an ambitious video game project helmed by a group of YouTubers called The Yogscast, raised over $567,000 back in 2012 to make what they called “the game you’ve always wanted.”

Last week, the developers of Yogventures announced that they had cancelled the game, and that backers would not be getting refunds. So what happened? Where did the money go? Let’s break it down.

sirkowski:

paysagemauvais:

Lucifer et deux diables fromIllustrations de Les Menus propos; engraving by Gabriel Salmon; printed by Gilles Couteau, Paris, 1521 [Cote : Res Ye 293/microfilm R 75746]

Middle French is hard…
On dit que le songe est une illusion.Quand en songeant on a la vision.D’aucune chose advenir impossible.Souvent on songe aucun songe nuisible.L’autre très doux, courtois et gracieux.Dormant un jour fus si fantasieux (?).L’an mil cinq cents vingt et un en Octobre.
They say dreams are an illusion.When dreaming we have a vision.That nothing will be impossible.Often we dream of nothing harmful.The other very gentle, courteous and gracious.Dreaming one day so fantastic (fantasy?).The year thousand five hundred twenty one in October.
Who’s the idiot who decided to use the same letter for U and V?

sirkowski:

paysagemauvais:

Lucifer et deux diables fromIllustrations de Les Menus propos; engraving by Gabriel Salmon; printed by Gilles Couteau, Paris, 1521 [Cote : Res Ye 293/microfilm R 75746]

Middle French is hard…

On dit que le songe est une illusion.
Quand en songeant on a la vision.
D’aucune chose advenir impossible.
Souvent on songe aucun songe nuisible.
L’autre très doux, courtois et gracieux.
Dormant un jour fus si fantasieux (?).
L’an mil cinq cents vingt et un en Octobre.

They say dreams are an illusion.
When dreaming we have a vision.
That nothing will be impossible.
Often we dream of nothing harmful.
The other very gentle, courteous and gracious.
Dreaming one day so fantastic (fantasy?).
The year thousand five hundred twenty one in October.

Who’s the idiot who decided to use the same letter for U and V?

courtneygodbey:

I received a lot of kind comments on my previous Mary Marvel drawing so I wanted to try to create an actual comic with her. I’ve never done a comic like this before, but it was a lot of fun to experiment with something new!

vexednature:

"exotic" is for plants, not people

"exotic" is for plants, not people

"exotic" is for plants, not people

ursulavernon:

treasureboxsky:

Coalcats are living constructs built specifically for dangerous work in mines or in spaceports. They feed off of anything that burns by opening the hatch in their stomach and tossing it in, though coal seems to generally be the favorite food of choice. Due to their impervious nature and love of work their popularity caused their numbers to soar into the millions. Upset by the sudden lack of jobs the living meat beings put a ban on production of Coalcats roughly eighty years ago, hoping their numbers would dwindle through natural causes and various accidents.
Suffice it to say they did not, and in an effort to keep their jobs and their lives the Coalcats have formed their very own workers union and are now considered their own race, thanks to their efforts.

Love this!

ursulavernon:

treasureboxsky:

Coalcats are living constructs built specifically for dangerous work in mines or in spaceports. They feed off of anything that burns by opening the hatch in their stomach and tossing it in, though coal seems to generally be the favorite food of choice. Due to their impervious nature and love of work their popularity caused their numbers to soar into the millions. Upset by the sudden lack of jobs the living meat beings put a ban on production of Coalcats roughly eighty years ago, hoping their numbers would dwindle through natural causes and various accidents.

Suffice it to say they did not, and in an effort to keep their jobs and their lives the Coalcats have formed their very own workers union and are now considered their own race, thanks to their efforts.

Love this!

heroofthreefaces:

Autism Analogy (For Those Who Understand Computers)

myautisticpov:

While I appreciate that this will still be lost on many people, it’s the best way I’ve come up with for describing my autism.

I run Linux (it doesn’t matter which Linux - let’s assume Ubuntu). NTs run Windows.

Sure, Windows is more user friendly and has more functionality in some areas. Linux takes a bit more know-how to do some of the things which are fairly simple on Windows. But Linux is better for other things, if you know how to use it.

Sure, some programs take some effort to get running, and sometimes you just have to give in and run it through a Windows emulator, which is harder work for the system.

But most of the problems come from the fact that the majority of other people run Windows, and assume you do too.

Even your work assumes you run it, and everything is built around that assumption.

A lot of people don’t develop for Linux since they don’t consider you a large enough demographic to bother. Hell, Valve are the only ones pushing for games to be developed for you.

So, you use what you can. Open Office is just as good as Microsoft, even if the functionality is a little different.

The issue is sending files to other people. They try to open them in MS Office and it does work, but it might not get all of the formatting right. Seemingly a little thing, but it’ll be enough for co-workers and friends to exclaim “It would be so much easier if you just ran Windows!”

And you want to tell them that it would also be easier if they ran Linux. But, of course, they would tell you that was ridiculous. Who wants to put up with that?

But they don’t seem to mind when you manage to do your work faster than they thought possible, because you weren’t trying to run everything through a clunky OS, or an emulator.

Not to mention the mess that is Windows 8…

- Caroline

amischiefofmice:

melkior:

send hELP

this just shows why you gotta get at these kind of problems early b/c you just put it off and put it off and you get a flamingo boom before you know it

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.

Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!

I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared.

Don’t be me.

chesikitty:

i haven’t had anything to do with chobits since like.. early middle school but i still really like chii b/c she’s cute as a button LIKE THE BUTTON IN HER KITTY CORNER, EH? EHHHHHH???? YOU GET IT?

chesikitty:

i haven’t had anything to do with chobits since like.. early middle school but i still really like chii b/c she’s cute as a button LIKE THE BUTTON IN HER KITTY CORNER, EH? EHHHHHH???? YOU GET IT?